How To Approach Small, Medium And Big Bloggers For A Guest Post

picture of Guest BloggingThere are 3 different types of blogs – small, medium and big blogs. Each of them functions very differently and the bloggers that run them think very differently as well.

When you’re contacting other bloggers, you need to make sure you understand which kind of blogger you’re talking to – small, medium or big – and tailor your message to make sure you connect with them appropriately.

Let’s go through how to approach these different types of bloggers when you want to publish a guest post on their blog.

1. Small Blogs

Small blogs are generally Pagerank 2 or less and usually get less than 1000 visitors a day to their site. When you first start out with your own blog, this is your realm – and these are the bloggers you will be working with first. And many of them will want to work with you – because you’re in the same boat at the same time.

It’s important when you’re contacting small bloggers that you understand a few things:

Some small bloggers are not serious about blogging – they just decided to start a blog – so they may not have even listed their contact info on their blog. Furthermore, they may have quit blogging altogether. Make sure you check their site to see if they’ve posted anything recently. If the last post you see is from several years ago, just move on – they’re not actively blogging (on that site) anymore.

Small bloggers rarely get contacted by other bloggers and rarely get asked by someone like you to write a guest article for their site – so most small bloggers are flattered when you genuinely reach out to them asking to collaborate.

This is good – this is great – because it’s these small bloggers who will be crucial to your early success as a blogger. If you post guest articles on 20-30 high quality small blogs with a link back to your blog, you will become one of the larger small bloggers in your niche, almost on the verge of becoming a medium blog. Google will quickly recognize you as a reputable blogger with that many links from other bloggers.

2. Medium Blogs

Medium blogs generally get more than 1000 visitors a day and are usually Pagerank 3, 4 or 5. A medium blog might get up to 5,000 or even 10,000 visitors a day. A medium blog will be most likely be generating decent revenue from advertisements, affiliate sales and sponsorships. Some medium bloggers make a decent living blogging, others are just scraping by.

In general, medium bloggers are usually passionate about their blog and always looking for ways to improve. This is your key to approaching a medium blogger – helping them improve their blog and improve their standing and traffic online. Medium bloggers often accept guest blog posts because there’s just not enough time in the day to generate enough new content to keep their blog buzzing – you could be the answer to their prayers!

When you contact a medium blogger, you will want to make sure you personalize your message to them to let them know you have actually read their blog and actually care about them and their mission. Medium bloggers get enough traffic to where they receive spam, probably daily, from people who want to get links from their site in one way or another. You need to stand out from the competition by writing a relevant, genuine message that will connect with them – and show them how you can add value to their blog by providing high quality content.

If you have some really great relevant articles on your own blog, you can link to them as examples of your work. If you have some nice stats (like your site gets 700 visitors a day) to share with them, that also can make you more credible. But genuinely a medium blogger won’t care about that – they just want to know that you’re an expert who can add value to them by writing a great guest post – and maybe promoting them on social media as well.

3. Big Blogs

Big blogs are in a totally unique position of their own. Big blogs generally get over 10,000 visitors a day, many of them get 50,000 to 100,000 visitors a day. Blogs like TechCrunch, Engadget, Gizmodo, The Verge, and others receive a massive amount of traffic and they are not small blogging operations (anymore) – they are small to medium sized blogging companies. This means they don’t use have one blogger who’s in charge of calling the shots.
Big blogs are generally PR 6 or higher and have an Alexa Rank of 5000 or less.

Big blogs often have a business structure something like this:

  • One owner (or a few partners) who started the blog who may or may not participate in the day to day management anymore.
  • Many writers (5, 10, or even hundreds of writers who are freelance / part-time).
  • A full-time editor who’s in charge of scheduling publications, editing all the articles and making sure it fits their needs and style of blogging.
  • An advertising/PR manager who manages inquiries about advertising on the blog as well as media inquiries (sometimes these functions are split between two people).

This is just the basic structure, obviously every blog will be unique in their own way. But this new structure makes dealing with a big blog MUCH different than dealing with a small or medium blogger.

If you want to write a guest post for one of these big blogs (which will get you MASSIVE traffic and VERY HIGH QUALITY link(s), then you need to make sure you really understand them first.

This is why you always must do research before you even consider contacting a big blog.

Reseaching A Big Blog



When you first find a big blog in your niche that you would LOVE to get a link from – don’t just contact them right away like you would with a small blogger. I highly recommend reading their blog for at least 1 hour – read as many articles as you can, click as many pages as you can. Pay special attention to their “About” section, “Contact Us” section, and any sections related to hiring writers or accepting guest posts or inquiries.

What you want to do with this research is answer these questions:

1. What is the blog about?

You need to know this and not just “technology.” You need to know what kind of posts they post most often, which are the most successful, and what the About page says about what they do and WHY they do it. What makes them tick?

2. How long are the average blog posts?

3. Are there guest posts on the blog?

4. What kind of guest posts are there? (What topics, opinions, and who were the guest authors)

5. Who’s the editor? Who should I contact about guest blogging?

6. What kind of story angle would work best for them?

Once you ask these questions, then you’re ready to start planning your strategy. You need to find a story that will interest that blog enough for them to contact you to ask more. It’s not like they’re going to take your article and instantly publish it – they will want to ask questions and learn more about it most often. Your goal with a big blog is to START A RELATIONSHIP not get just one guest post published.

Honestly, you will probably get rejected most of the time from a big blog. The key is 1) focusing on the relationship and 2) pleasant persistence – continue sending them relevant, useful information that they will hopefully want to use in an article. Trust me, persistence pays off when dealing with these huge blogs – because just one mention could send you thousands or tens of thousands of highly targeted visitors to your site as well as provide you with a PR 6, 7, 8 or 9 link that is worth pure gold.

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